The Trussville Tribune http://www.trussvilletribune.com All your news, now for Trussville, Clay and Pinson Fri, 12 Feb 2016 19:52:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.10 VIDEO: Meet Trussville mayoral candidate Anthony Montalto http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/video-meet-trussville-mayoral-candidate-anthony-montalto/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/video-meet-trussville-mayoral-candidate-anthony-montalto/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 19:52:23 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28651 By Trussville Tribune Media

TRUSSVILLE –Election season is here with a few mayoral candidates already throwing their hat in the ring. The Tribune hopes to meet with every candidate for mayor in Trussville, Clay and Pinson and give them the opportunity to share the plans and vision for the city they hope to serve.

Brannon Dawkins of Tribune Media had the opportunity to speak with Trussville mayoral candidate Anthony Montalto this week. You can watch the interview below.

Brannon Dawkins sat down with Trussville mayoral candidate Anthony Montalto.

Brannon Dawkins sat down with Trussville mayoral candidate Anthony Montalto.

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Years of abuse preceded Trussville murder http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/years-of-abuse-preceded-trussville-murder/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/years-of-abuse-preceded-trussville-murder/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 19:41:03 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28637 By Scott Buttram

Publisher

TRUSSVILLE –Since 2010, there have been five homicides in four separate incidents in Trussville. All were the result of domestic situations.

Three of the four cases ended when the shooter committed suicide. In the remaining case, Freddie Earl Patton awaits trial in the shooting death of Ken Millar, the father of his common-law wife.

While some of the incidents may have had some forewarning, none had been as extensively documented in the legal system as the murder-suicide that took place this week.

Brittaney Owens Photo via Facebook

Brittaney Owens
Photo via Facebook

Before Troy Green, 29, of Birmingham, shot and killed Brittaney Owens, 26, of Trussville, his estranged girlfriend and mother of his 3-year-old child, Owens had alleged abuse. Years of abuse, according to court documents.

In the early morning hours on Tuesday, one final act of domestic violence took place when Green waited on Owens to return home to her parent’s house on North Lake Drive, police allege. There, he blocked the road with his BMW and bumped her Chevrolet as she arrived.

He then got out of his vehicle, walked up to her car, and shot Owens twice in the chest before returning to his car and turning the gun on himself.

The couples’ troubled relationship was known to local authorities. Trussville police had arrested Green in 2014 on charges of domestic violence.

Owens had filed for a protection order against Green in 2012.

In April of 2014, Owens asked the court to dismiss her complaint, saying the couple would work together communicate and that she wanted her son to have his father in his life.

In her original request for an order of protection from Green, Owens outlined multiple instances of violence dating back to 2012.

Owens alleged that Green had pushed her to the ground outside of her home in April of 2012 when she was seven months pregnant with their child.

The numerous incidents of violence covered the next two years. Owens alleged that Green and grabbed her throat in one incident and  shown up and threatened her at a restaurant, prompting people who saw the episode to call the police, in another outburst of anger.

Owens stated that there was a time when she was thrown to the ground while holding her child, threats with a weapon and verbal threats than included Green saying he would “blow her brains out.”

Trussville police captain Jeff Bridges said the 2014 charges against Green were still making their way through the court system when the shooting occurred.

“It’s not closed out, yet,” Bridges said.

The two were no longer a couple, according to information gathered by Trussville detectives.

Bridges said the detective spoke to Owens’ parents who said Green had threatened her in the past and placed a GPS tracking device on her car.

“I personally don’t understand it,” Bridges said. “This is certainly not the answer for either one. For a child to grow up without a mother or a father. It’s a shame. It’s tragic for all involved but, unfortunately, this stuff happens way too much.”

 

 

 

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Hewitt’s season ends in area tournament  http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/hewitts-season-ends-in-area-tournament/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/hewitts-season-ends-in-area-tournament/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 17:56:55 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28646 By Kyle Parmley/Cahaba Sun

HOOVER — Spain Park put four players in double figures, as the Jags knocked off Hewitt-Trussville, 73-47, in the first round of the Class 7A, Area 6 Tournament on Thursday night.
Josh Monski in Bryant Bank Arena. Photo by Ron Burkett

Josh Monski in Bryant Bank Arena. Photo by Ron Burkett

The top-seeded Jags are the host of the tournament, and took hold of a 13-point lead after the first half and pulled away in the final two periods.

Austin Wiley led the way for Spain Park with 19 points, seven rebounds, and two blocks. Jamal Johnson added 14, Justin Brown 13, and Bailey DeFalco scored 11 points, all in the fourth quarter.

Harrison Stanley paced the Huskies with 15 points. Glen Horsley scored eight, and Matt Hicks and T.J. Alexander chipped in six each.

Spain Park’s win sets up another matchup with Mountain Brook in the area final, and will be the third meeting between the two schools this season. The victory also reserves the Jags a spot in the regional round of the state playoffs.

Hewitt-Trussville’s season ends with the loss.

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Valentine’s Day still stresses me out http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/valentines-day-still-stresses-me-out/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/valentines-day-still-stresses-me-out/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 17:47:45 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28641 by Dale Jones

Editor

Even as I type this, there are men all over Trussville, Clay and Pinson frantically trying to figure out one of life’s more difficult questions – “What should I get my significant other for Valentine’s Day?

Yes, the day is upon us once again, and men everywhere are struggling to be creative.

Long gone are the days where guys like me could go with the standard flowers and candy and get away with it.

Oh no!

Here in 2016, so much more is expected of us, and the pressure is on.

How did it come to this?

What has caused the expectations of the love of our life to go from simple heart-shaped pieces of candy with the words “be mine” stamped across them to a diamond heart necklace from Tiffany’s, a $500 Coach purse or an evening in a renovated castle?

Listen, I even know a guy who bought for his wife a North Pole dogsled expedition.

Trussville Tribune editor Dale Jones

Trussville Tribune editor Dale Jones

Wait…what?

On the other hand, some girls don’t want anything. A few years back, I asked a gal to go with me to a Valentine’s Day dance and she told me she couldn’t be my valentine for medical reasons.

I said, “Really?”

She said, “Yeah, you make me sick.”

But over the years, I’ve tried to become more creative.

I once decided to grab my guitar and serenade my sweetie, under her window in the moonlight.

Attempting to be as romantic as possible, I went with those timeless lyrics penned by Beth Slater Whitson back in 1910:

Let me call you sweetheart, I’m in love with you

Let me hear you whisper that you love me too

Keep the love-light glowing in your eyes so true

Let me call you sweetheart, I’m in love with you.

I waited for her anxiously to come bouncing down the stairs, ripping the front door off of the hinges and jumping into my arms.

I waited…and waited…and waited.

Then I watched as her window opened and these are the words she sang back to me:

Let me call you sweetheart, I’m in love with you automobile

Let me hear you whisper that you’ll pay the gasoline bill

Keep those head lights burning and your hands on the steering wheel

Let me call you sweetheart, I’m in love with your automobile.

I could go on and on with story after story about attempts to impress the girl of my dreams far beyond flowers and candy.

Maybe I should have figured something out when I realized that every year I had a different girl of my dreams.

Bottom line is this guys – if your girl truly loves you, it won’t matter if you get her a trip to Belize or a gift card to Barnes and Noble. If she loves you, she’s going to love whatever you get her.

But don’t give her golf balls. Just trust me, don’t give her golf balls.

Until next week!

 

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Guidelines in place for downtown Trussville business district http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/guidelines-in-place-for-downtown-trussville-business-district/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/guidelines-in-place-for-downtown-trussville-business-district/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 17:09:27 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28638 by Dale Jones 

Editor

Trussville City Council members voted unanimously on Tuesday in favor of a downtown overlay zoning ordinance that will help guide the direction of development in the downtown business district.

Visions for the direction of the downtown redevelopment effort began several years ago in a meeting at the Trussville Civic Center where hundreds of citizens met to discuss developing a master plan for downtown.

Trussville City Hall File photo

Trussville City Hall
File photo

According to Councilman Buddy Choat, there were some issues with the original plan that was presented to city leaders that needed to be addressed.

“There were some issues in there that we were not comfortable with,” said Choat. “But with the help of our city attorney, City Clerk Lynn Porter, Councilman Perry Cook, Jan Bailey from planning and zoning, and others, they were able to come up with an amendment to the existing ordinance that we were all happy with.”

After a joint meeting between council members and planning and zoning board members, the ordinance was agreed upon and presented Tuesday night for adoption.

Intended to promote future commercial development, the downtown overlay district is strategically aimed at providing a comfortable, walkable, attractive environment  for shopping, dining, living and civic activities in the downtown business district.

The district will promote commercial development that is consistent to the surrounding residential areas, the existing traffic corridor, the traditional commercial function of the area and the goals in the downtown master plan.

Standards set forth in the overlay district ordinance will apply to all properties within the downtown business district in addition to the underlying classification standards for each property.

“I think this document provides a good overview of what we want downtown to eventually look like,” Choat said.

After a public hearing, where no comments were offered, the ordinance passed unanimously.

 

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Huskies’ McElwain offered by Vanderbilt http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/huskies-mcelwain-offered-by-vanderbilt/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/huskies-mcelwain-offered-by-vanderbilt/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:23:34 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28629 Form Trussville Tribune staff reports

TRUSSVILLE –Hewitt-Trussville senior Bailey McElwain announced via Twitter Wednesday night that he had been offered by Vanderbilt.

McElwain has committed to Stanford, but did not sign with the Cardinal on national signing day, stating he remained firmly committed, but would join the team in the summer of 2017.

Former Hewitt-Trussville linebacker Bailey McElwain. Photo via Hewitt-Trussville athletics

Former Hewitt-Trussville linebacker Bailey McElwain. Photo via Hewitt-Trussville athletics

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Reflections on 50 years of Southern Living – Trussville’s John Floyd embodies the qualities his magazine represented http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/reflections-on-50-years-of-southern-living-trussvilles-john-floyd-embodies-the-qualities-his-magazine-represented/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/12/reflections-on-50-years-of-southern-living-trussvilles-john-floyd-embodies-the-qualities-his-magazine-represented/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 15:19:43 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28626 by Kris Robinette

For The Tribune

BURK5107 (1)

“A lot of people don’t’ realize that the South has really (gone from) in 1966 being a sort of an impoverished part of the country to being the number one economic driver in the country. And really in a matter of thirty years. And that’s an amazing thing that happened.” -photo by Ron Burkett

Picking up a copy of Southern Living magazine is like visiting with an old friend.  It’s rocking-chair easy, comfortable and inspiring.  It’s not a guide on how to be southern, but rather a celebration of being Southern.  John Floyd, long-time Southern Living Editor, embodies these same qualities.  He is easy, comfortable and inspiring – and unabashedly southern.

“My goal was and always has been that Southern Living is not for the wealthy individual.  It is for the middle-class Southerner who enjoys the good things. In that respective, it says you can be serving barbeque one night and cordon bleu the next night,” said Floyd, summing up the magazine’s core concept from his home in Trussville.  “So you want to make sure you have diversity but a homogeneous diversity with ‘south’ as the undercurrent.  So that’s the way we developed the magazine.”

As Southern Living celebrates its 50th anniversary this month, John Floyd has every reason to reflect on the success of the magazine.  Although he first joined Southern Progress in 1977, Floyd’s tenure as editor-in-chief of Southern Living magazine spanned from 1990 until 2008, an incredible eighteen years.

Magazine theology dies hard and Floyd still easily slips into editor mode.  “You only have about 40 seconds to sell a magazine in the grocery store – usually about 7 seconds.  So generally they look at the picture and one key word.”  As he reflects on his time at the magazine, two key words surface that summarize his own tenure:  Evolution and connection.

According to Floyd, these two interlocking concepts were key to the magazine’s success, despite the challenging period of the launch.  “When Southern Living was conceived, it was a huge risk,” he stated, addressing the negativity surrounding the South in 1966.  In fact, the phrase, “modern south” was coined to address the forward-progress of the culture at that time.

“A lot of people don’t’ realize that the South has really (gone from) in 1966 being a sort of an impoverished part of the country to being the number one economic driver in the country.  And really in a matter of thirty years.  And that’s an amazing thing that happened.  By the time it started in February of 1966 to the time I became editor, we were a major economic force in this country.  One of the things that we spent a great deal of funds on was to look at our readers and find out what our readers wanted.”

It is a stunningly simple concept that has worked.

FullSizeRender (2)

photo by Scott Buttram

The magazine canvassed readers on a monthly and yearly basis to better understand what readers craved.  But, more importantly, it was not afraid to strip away the “gloss” in favor of more authenticity and simplicity. “For instance, we really started realizing how important weddings were in the South,” said Floyd.  “We had looked at a lot of wedding publications but they weren’t doing real weddings.  They were always sort of manufactured.”  According to Floyd, the focus of the Southern Living lens became more relatable, ditching the fake wedding cakes used in other shoots, and striving for more realistic expectations.  “…your daughter doesn’t’ want to see a picture of a bride more beautiful than she’ll ever be.  You want to be able to picture yourself.  So we picked a picture that was just very connecting and titled it ‘Simply Gorgeous.’  And it was a runaway hit.”

This grassroots connection and unique understanding of southern culture changed the face of publishing.

Floyd brightened with the ease of a friend recalling an inside joke, “The phrase ‘Can you find it in Buckatunna?’ was used so often in the Southern Living test kitchens that it was eventually printed on a tee-shirt.”

Buckatunna is a town in eastern Mississippi that is so small that the staffers used it as a litmus test for small-town availability of ingredients.  If you couldn’t locate the necessary ingredients in Buckatunna, Mississippi, the recipe might need an adjustment.

According to Floyd, one of his greatest personal and professional accomplishments is giving the Southern Living audience the inspiration and confidence to make quality improvements to how they live.   -photo by Ron Burkett

According to Floyd, one of his greatest personal and professional accomplishments is giving the Southern Living audience the inspiration and confidence to make quality improvements to how they live. -photo by Ron Burkett

This very real reader connection is what set the publication apart from others at the time.  It not only brought the magazine to coffee tables but to kitchen counters, potting sheds and suitcases.

In fact, Southern Living – and particularly the magazine’s original recipes – has become so interwoven with southern culture that many no longer recognize the original source.  One little-known fact about the magazine’s test kitchens is that staffers were routinely challenged to develop recipes using sponsor ingredients.  This mother-of-invention task led to such popular and quirky dishes as Pam-spray croutons, Dole Smoothies and the classic Milky Way cake.

But don’t mistake this rather pedestrian approach as lighthearted. “…it showed the power of the magazine to advertisers,” explained Floyd.  Understanding that the release of a new recipe might cause ingredients to fly off the shelves, staff often touched base with local grocers as a courtesy.  It was not uncommon to see key shelves double-stocked and flagged with “as seen in Southern Living” signs, underscoring the fierce economic impact of the magazine.

Food, home, gardening, travel – all synonymous with southern culture – have been the framework of the magazine since its inception.  Yet all have all followed the fluid thinking of readership over time.

“Food remains an integral part of southern culture and has its place in the media.  Even so, it changes as the reader’s approach to food changes,” explained Floyd, addressing the pendulum swings where healthy and convenience foods have polarized and merged over the

years.  “What you’re seeing is a magazine that is evolving as the South evolves.  As its reader’s evolve.”

According to Floyd, one of his greatest personal and professional accomplishments is giving the Southern Living audience the inspiration and confidence to make quality improvements to how they live.

Pam and John Floyd chose to raise their sons, Alex and Ryan, on the eastern side of Birmingham in Trussville, giving a comfortable space between work and family life.  Both sons have settled nearby, one in Crestline and one most recently in Trussville.  As son Ryan and daughter-in-law Samantha worked to make their new home their own, the Floyds helped them tackle home improvement projects.  While this particular instance was decidedly personal, that same trickledown effect is repeated countless times on a broader scale, which pleases Floyd.

“People see things and they realize they work.  They may not know why they work, but realize that they do.  That is what impacts the community even if they are not readers.  That is the success of the magazine.”

This practical, sleeves-up, hands-on connection is reflected in John Floyd’s own approach to life.  John, with a horticulture degree earned at Clemson, was hired as Senior Horticulturist by Southern Living in 1977 and held various leadership positions before assuming the title of Editor in Chief in 1990.  He became Vice President of the magazine two years later.  Yet Floyd’s decision to retire at age sixty seems surprisingly pragmatic.

“I always felt like I needed to retire, to not get past the reader’s age.  The average reader age has always been around forty-five or forty-six,” he explained.  “The magazine business is very different.  It’s all built on reader connections.  When you have 18 million readers a month in

seventeen states, you’ve got a little different perspective to look at.”

But retirement might be a gray area for Floyd.  In addition to volunteering every Tuesday in the Japanese Gardens at the Botanical Gardens, he has created a successful blog (Birminghamgardeningtoday.com.)  According to Floyd, the blog fills a much-needed vacancy for gardening knowledge at the local level, offering landscape design advice and Q&A from industry professionals such as himself.

“At one year old, it’s just a baby trying to crawl,” said Floyd.  His desire is to see the local, backyard gardener have a reliable and professional source for information beyond the extension service.  He also embraces it as a place where he can give forthright advice without heavy censorship.  When asked whether he would like to see it grow as an industry project, he was quick to point out that he doesn’t want to see it outgrow itself too quickly or to rely too heavily on advertising.

But, he said with a smile, “The next great wave of media is local media.”

For thirty years John Floyd was a man who seemed more comfortable drawing attention to the written word rather than himself.  He still is.  And the summation for his success in publishing a southern culture magazine is both profound and encompassing.

“At some point we stopped looking at ourselves through the same lens that others viewed us.”

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UPDATED: Water main north of Pinson repaired http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/11/water-main-break-north-of-pinson/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/11/water-main-break-north-of-pinson/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:58:05 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28623 From Trussville Tribune staff reports

BIRMINGHAM –UPDATE: Water main has been repaired.

Main break repaired at Old Bradford Road. Thanks for your patience!

Posted by Birmingham Water Works on Friday, February 12, 2016

 

The Birmingham Water Works Board is reporting a water main break at 7915 Old Bradford Road, just north of Pinson.

According to BWWB, the water will be off until after midnight Thursday.

Screenshot 2016-02-11 at 9.53.51 PM

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VIDEO: Meet Trussville mayoral candidate Buddy Choat http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/11/video-meet-trussville-mayoral-candidate-buddy-choat/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/11/video-meet-trussville-mayoral-candidate-buddy-choat/#comments Thu, 11 Feb 2016 21:19:19 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28620 By Trussville Tribune Media

TRUSSVILLE –Election season is here with a few mayoral candidates already throwing their hat in the ring. The Tribune hopes to meet with every candidate for mayor in Trussville, Clay and Pinson and give them the opportunity to share the plans and vision for the city they hope to serve.

Brannon Dawkins of Tribune Media had the opportunity to speak with Trussville mayoral candidate Buddy Choat this week. You can watch the interview below.

Brannon Dawkins sat down with Trussville mayoral candidate Buddy Choat.

Brannon Dawkins sat down with Trussville mayoral candidate Buddy Choat.

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Authorities seek man who may have passed counterfeit bills http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/11/authorities-seek-man-who-may-have-passed-counterfeit-bills/ http://www.trussvilletribune.com/2016/02/11/authorities-seek-man-who-may-have-passed-counterfeit-bills/#comments Thu, 11 Feb 2016 16:42:43 +0000 http://www.trussvilletribune.com/?p=28617 From Trussville Tribune staff reports

TRUSSVILLE –Law enforcement officials are trying to identify a man who may have passed counterfeit money at local restaurants.

On January 28, during the early morning hours, an unidentified black male with bald head allegedly passed several counterfeit bills at restaurants in Gardendale and Fultondale.

Gardendale police are seeking this man's identity.  Photo via Crimestopper of Metro  Alabama

Gardendale police are seeking this man’s identity.
Photo via Crimestopper of Metro Alabama

 

Gardendale detectives believe the person in these photos to be the unidentified suspect in these crimes. According to Gardendale detectives, counterfeit $50 and $20 dollar bills were passed at both locations during this time.

They believe this suspect was driving a maroon mid 1990’s minivan, either Mazda or Mercury in make.

If you think you know this person, or anything about these crimes, please contact Crime Stoppers of Metro Alabama at 254-7777.

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